Improve Relationships: Could Your Job Lead to Divorce? 15 Jobs With The Highest Divorce Rates

change jobs to improve relationships

Change jobs to improve relationships?


How much does your job impact your relationship? It could be more than you think.

You have been with your significant other for a while now. You’d like to think that your relationship is like a rock and that nothing can shake it, but could your job eventually cost you everything?

The divorce rate in some professions is above 40%, while in others it is as low as 4%. So, the unfortunate reality is that your job could have plenty of input as to whether your relationship is successful or not.

But most people can’t just change jobs to improve relationships

Many people are already entrenched in a career before they meet the person they will marry. If they subsequently met the person of their dreams, how many would consider a career change to make that relationship work? And is divorce rate something we should consider before accepting a job? Can choosing a different job really improve relationships in the big scheme of things?

An article written by Pennyhoarder discusses the jobs that might cause friction in a relationship and those that might lead to smooth sailing.

Here is the list of the top 15 jobs and their corresponding divorce rates:

  1. Dancers and Choreographers – 43.05%
  2. Bartenders – 38.43%
  3. Massage Therapists – 38.22%
  4. Casino workers (cashiers and money counters) – 34.66%
  5. Extruding machine operators – 32.74%
  6. Gaming service workers (dealers and other workers) – 31.35%
  7. Factory workers – 29.78%
  8. Telephone operators – 29.30%
  9. Nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides – 28.95%
  10. Entertainers and performers, sports and related workers – 28.49%
  11. Baggage porters and concierges – 28.49%
  12. Telemarketers – 28.10%
  13. Waiters/waitresses – 27.12%
  14. Roofers – 26.85%
  15. Maids and housekeeping cleaners – 26.38%

In some of these jobs, it is easy to see how there could be additional stress and friction on a relationship due to working environment. Let’s say your typical workweek is 40 hours, even though statistically, the average workweek in the US is about 47 these days. But based on a 40 hour week, then almost 25% of our time is being spent at work. 

Next to sleeping, most people spend more time at work than any other activity. This is one reason we spend so much time talking about work life balance. Additionally, there are obviously many relationships that start at work – there really is no choice but to have a relationship of some capacity with co-workers. Having said that, it’s plain to see that the physical touch, and often the intimacy, of dancing could lead to some bumps in the road.

And for those in the following professions, your prospects for remaining together are much higher:

  1. Nuclear engineers – 7.29%
  2. Podiatrists – 6.81%
  3. Sales engineers – 6.61%
  4. Clergy – 5.61%
  5. Transit and railroad police – 5.26%
  6. Optometrist – 4.01%

Hurry, it is not too late to go back to school and start studying the eye to improve relationships now or in the future! 96% survival rate is hard to beat.

 

 

 

 

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